Questões de Inglês

Pesquise mais Questões de Inglês Utilizando o Filtro abaixo,

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

Considering the book review above, judge the following items, julgue os itens.

The book is student-friendly when it comes to developing a gradual understanding of concepts.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

Considering the book review above, judge the following items, julgue os itens.

It can be infered from the text that the author of the book is a famous computer programmer.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

Considering the book review above, judge the following items, julgue os itens.

The author of the review states that he is unware of how the current edition differs from the others.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

Considering the book review above, judge the following items, julgue os itens.

The digital format of the book will be launched soon.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

According to the text, judge the items below, julgue os itens.

The thought processes underlying the development of object-oriented software are fully comprehended by developers in general.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

According to the text, judge the items below, julgue os itens.

Among the good aspects of the book, the author of the review mentions the examples given and the use of pictures and diagrams.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

According to the text, judge the items below, julgue os itens.

Procedural programming and object-oriented paradigms have existed for more than 50 years.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

According to the text, judge the items below, julgue os itens.

The example codes are presented in C#, but the book offers support for those who use other languages.

CESPE - TJ - SE - Analista Judiciário - Análise de Sistemas - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Procedural programming has been around since the inception of computers and programming. Object-oriented paradigms arrived a little later — in the late 1950s to early 1960s — which means over 50 years of object-oriented problem solving. Still, many developers lack a full understanding of the thought process in developing object-oriented software and therefore can’t take advantage of its concepts. I’m happy to see that this book, The Object-Oriented Thought Process, has taken this fairly old perspective and given it full attention and renewed interest.
Not having read the previous editions, I’m not familiar with the changes represented in this fourth edition. Author Matt Weisfeld is a professor who understands these important concepts and the level of knowledge and process required for readers and students to grasp what they need to know. The examples in the book are concise, clear, and easy to follow. Additionally, the book makes good use of white space, lists, pictures, and diagrams to make the content easier to follow and scan quickly.
Weisfeld has organized the concepts to build on each other, ensuring that students understand one concept well before moving to the next. On the other hand, readers who already understand the fundamentals can go directly to object-oriented thought processes for particular programming paradigms, such as Web services or client-server applications.
The book is language-neutral. Its examples are in C#, but a supplementary website offers example code in other languages. If your language isn’t fairly represented, don’t be deterred from acquiring this book because object-oriented concepts and semantics are mostly universal — just the particular implementation might vary due to the language.
Each chapter contains UML and example code to better understand the concepts and see how they’re implemented. The last chapter introduces design patterns but without going into great detail about how to use them. This lets the inexperienced reader know that design patterns would be the next step in the path to developing good code.
Overall, I can recommend this book to code developers, designers, and testers — to anyone with an interest in proper software development semantics. It"s available in a digital format that serves as a useful ready reference.


Scott Brookhart. Thinking about objects. Internet: (adapted).

According to the text, judge the items below, julgue os itens.

Design patterns are presented deeply and extensively in the last chapter of the book.

FGV - SEGEP - MA - Auditor do Estado - P1 - 2014
Questões de Inglês / Geral

Text 1


Technology: A Blessing or a Curse During the Audit?

The pace of technology change continues to move at what seems to be nearly the speed of light and shows no real signs of slowing down. What is considered a new technology today is old technology tomorrow. In contrast to the speed of change in technology, consider the speed of change in the audit world. Unfortunately, audit processes and approaches have not changed in what seems to be light years.
Many firms jumped on the technology bandwagon over the past several years but frequently question their return on investment through enhanced efficiency and improved audit effectiveness. Bill Gates is quoted at stating, “The first rule of any technology used in a business is that automation applied to an efficient operation will magnify the efficiency. The second is that automation applied to an inefficient operation will magnify the inefficiency.” Unfortunately, many firms unknowingly followed Mr. Gates’ second rule and have applied technology to inefficient processes. The end result has been minimal improvement in efficiency and effectiveness, at best. While many firms wanted their technology investment to be a blessing, it just hasn’t turned out that way. The good news is that it is not too late. You can turn the tide and have technology utilization become a tremendous asset in your audit process.


(adapted from http://www.kscpa.org/writable/files/Anderson AuditExpress/technologyblessingorcurse.pdf)

The title of Text 1 presents a(n):

a) doubt.
b) addition.
c) certainty.
d) emphasis.
e) conclusion.

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